YET ANOTHER ELON MUSK EXPLODING ROCKET SHIP – WHEN WILL SPACEX ADMIT THEY ARE FAILURES?

Elon’s Starship rocket comes crashing back down to earth: $3bn SpaceX craft breaks apart and GOES MISSING in what had been a successful test flight until the last minute

SpaceX revealed around 10:35am ET that the world’s most powerful rocket was destroyed during atmospheric re-entry and is missing – about one-hour after Starship launched.

 

Elon Musk‘s Starship rocket did not survive reentry into the atmosphere following a successful mission that saw the craft reach 145 miles above Earth’s surface.

The two-stage craft, consisting of the Starship cruise vessel mounted atop its towering Super Heavy rocket booster, achieved liftoff from SpaceX‘s Boca Chica, Texas, flight test facility on the Gulf Coast at 9:25am ET.

But SpaceX revealed around 10:35am ET that the world’s most powerful rocket was destroyed during atmospheric re-entry and is missing.

‘The team has made the call that the ship has been lost, so no splashdown today,’ said Dan Huot, SpaceX communications manager, during the live broadcast.

‘But again, just it’s incredible to see how much further we got this time around.’

SpaceX’s mission plan did not include recovering the rocket from the Indian Ocean, but Starship breaking up in the atmosphere was unexpected.

Despite the tragic ending, Thursday’s test flight was the farthest performed with a Starship rocket – two previous attempts exploded while in mid-air.

The two-stage Starship, taller than the Statue of Liberty, achieved liftoff from SpaceX ‘s Boca Chica, Texas , flight test facility on the Gulf Coast at 9:25am ET

The upper Starship stage reached an altitude of about 145 miles above the surface and topped speeds of around 15,000 miles per hour as it soared into orbit, capturing stunning views of space and the curvature of Earth

The most powerful and largest launch vehicle ever constructed, Starship achieved one key first goal: successful separation from its Super Heavy booster.

While the booster, dubbed Booster 10, feel back to Earth and crashed into the Gulf of Mexico as planned, only a few engines were still firing – and how it impacted the water is unclear.

However, a failed separation is what forced SpaceX to pull the kill switch during its first attempt, which saw Starship explode mid-air.

With the loss of the booster, all eyes were on Starship while it hung in the blackness of space preparing for a splashdown in the Indian Ocean.

As the massive rocket reentered the atmosphere, a ‘plasma blanket’ of heated flowed around its stainless-steel exterior.

The grounds team was set to ignite Starship’s engines after the rocket coasted back to Earth for 30 minutes, but it was later revealed they chose not to at the last second – the reason for the decision is unknow.

Data sharing was unexpectedly halted a after the world saw views of the glowing pink plasm engulfing the craft.

Scored to the rapturous cheering of SpaceX mission control, the craft ascended in a gleaming orange fury of fire and smoke: a blast off captured via numerous livestream cameras on and off Starship

More than two million people tuned into the live stream to watch the craft’s own perspective as it blazed past Earth’s upper atmosphere into the historic orbital phase of its mission

In-person spectators have watched live all morning through the foggy haze near SpaceX ‘s coastline Texas facility, some (pictured above) tailgating since the more sunny conditions on Wednesday near SpaceX’s Boca Chica, Texas, flight test facility along the Gulf

A few minutes later, SpaceX confirmed that the spacecraft had been lost, presumably either burning up or coming apart during re-entry or crashing into the sea.

While Starship was lost, SpaceX and fellow space enthusiasts are celebrating the mission as a success.

SpaceX’s operating officer, Gwynne Shotwell, posted on X: ‘HUGE congratulations to the entire team for this incredible day: clean count (glad the shrimpers could get out in the nick of time!), liftoff, hot staging, Super Heavy boost back and coast (and likely a couple engines making mainstage during landing burn!), clean ship ‘insertion’ and coast, payload door cycling and prop transfer demo (to be confirmed!), and ship entry!’

 

In-person spectators watched live all morning through the dawn’s foggy haze near SpaceX‘s coastline Texas facility, while the space company’s staff appeared to cover their eyes nervously inside mission control during the high stakes launch.

More than two million people tuned into the live stream to watch the craft’s own perspective as it blazed past Earth’s upper atmosphere into the historic orbital phase of its mission.

The craft’s Super Heavy booster had been engineered to land in a fashion similar to SpaceX’s smaller Falcon 9 rockets — in the case of today’s launch with the goal of achieving a soft splashdown in the Gulf of Mexico.

Starship ‘Ship 28’ itself had been designed to return from space by coasting in a drag-heavy ‘belly-flop’ through the atmosphere, using air friction to reduce its speed, before reorienting into a vertical ‘dive’ position for a safe plunge in the Indian Ocean.

On the SpaceX live feed, viewers witnessed a pink-fuchsia plasma of heated air develop around Starship as heat-friction escalated during the craft’s descent.

Typically, this ‘plasma blanket’ effect has acted as a barrier to transmissions between Starship and Musk’s Starlink satellites, which relay live video, telemetry data and other key signals to Earth.

But for several stunning moments — intermittently fuzzed by digital static — the live feed offered up images of a glowing halo around the craft akin to aurora borealis, or ‘the northern lights.’

On the SpaceX livefeed, viewers witnessed a pink-fuchsia plasma of heated air develop around Starship as heat-friction escalated during the craft’s ultimately unsuccessful descent

Typically, this ‘plasma blanket’ effect has acted as a barrier to transmissions between Starship and Musk’s Starlink satellites, which relay live video, telemetry data and other key signals to Earth. But for several stunning moments, the feed offered up a glowing halo around the craft

Reusability means that all of the expensive, painstakingly crafted hardware on the SpaceX craft, including its booster’s 33 Raptor full-flow staged combustion cycle (FFSC) engines and Starship’s own six Raptors, won’t just become ocean litter.

This efficient design hopes to cut down the cost of launching payloads into orbit, hitting a price of about $10 million to take 100 tons of material — and one-day NASA personnel — into space, to the moon and, if all goes well, Mars.

Early in the test, all 33 of the booster’s Raptor FFSC engines could be seen gleaming successfully in their hot stage burn, fully functioning as the craft rocketed into orbit.

Early in the test, all 33 of the booster’s Raptor FFSC engines could be seen gleaming successfully in their hot stage burn, fully functioning as the craft rocketed into orbit

Above, Starship’s Super Heavy booster as it began its planned separation from the craft. The booster has been engineered to land in a fashion similar to SpaceX’s smaller Falcon 9 rockets

But the feed cut out before the that booster, ‘Booster 10,’ could make its planned splashdown into the Gulf of Mexico, leaving that reusable rocket’s fate unclear

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) cleared SpaceX for its third Starship flight on Wednesday morning.

‘The FAA determined SpaceX met all safety, environmental, policy and financial responsibility requirements,’ the agency said in a statement.

The FAA’s ‘tiered environmental assessment’ focused on the environmental impact of Starship’s reentry and water landing in the Indian Ocean.

SpaceX says it has ‘significantly expanded’ Starship’s fire suppression systems and improved the autonomous systems that should have triggered the destruct command sooner during the rocket’s previous launch failures.

Starship’s first and failed test flight on April 20, 2023 — written as 4/20 in America, an internet meme and a reference to cannabis culture Musk enjoys alluding to — saw the rocket explode just 25 miles into the sky after its booster failed to detach.

Today’s Starship launch during its successful early phases

The craft’s reusability means that all of the space-faring vessel’s expensive, painstakingly crafted hardware, including the booster’s 33 Raptor full-flow staged combustion cycle engines and Starship’s own six Raptor engines, won’t just become wasted ocean litter

Although it’s unclear what Starship’s targeted altitude is, today’s flight aims to reach the sort of speeds needed to get a vehicle into orbit: approximately 17,500 miles per hour. Ahead of the launch, Musk posted to his X platform: ‘Starship launch attempt in ~5 hours. Let’s get to Mars’

SpaceX’s Starship and its unique, reusable Super Heavy booster (above) as fueling began Thursday of the rocket’s cryogenically cold, pressurized methane and liquid oxygen fuel

Starship (above, Thursday), shrouded in a drifting bank of fog, began its launch window at 8am Eastern (1200 GMT). The FAA cleared SpaceX for its third Starship flight on Wednesday,  saying it ‘met all safety, environmental, policy and financial responsibility requirements’

Elon Musk’s next-gen Starship (seen above on the launchpad Wednesday) launched Thursday morning; the 400-foot tall, reusable rocket achieved major milestones in its third orbital test

READ MORE: SpaceX manager forced female staffer to have unprotected sex with him twice a week then tried to bribe her with $100,000 for an abortion, lawsuit claims

A SpaceX employee filed a lawsuit against the company and her former manager who she claimed forced her to have an affair and feared she would lose her job if she didn’t agree to his advances.

SpaceX was forced to manually kill that first test flight four minutes in, as the rocket began spinning dangerously out of control.

It crashed in the Gulf of Mexico, throwing up a dust cloud over a town several miles away.

Outside of the FAA’s recommendations, SpaceX also stated that it has added a ‘hot stage’ separation system linking Starship to the Super Heavy Booster, and reinforced the launchpad with flame deflectors.

Starship is key to SpaceX’s future of providing reusable, affordable space transportation.

Unlike the Saturn V rocket which took astronauts to the moon, the SpaceX version — boosters and all — is designed to be completely reusable after returning to Earth in an effort to reduce costs.

NASA is banking on Musk’s firm coming through with rockets that will help it get humans to the moon and someday Mars ahead of China in the modern day space race. The clock is ticking for a modified Starship to be ready for a planned lunar landing in 2025.

Alongside NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) it will ferry astronauts to the moon, so long as all things go to plan.

SpaceX itself is already heavily involved in the astro business, sending supplies and crew to the International Space Station and bringing astronauts back to Earth.

Author: swmof88